United States

Neil Perry

Applying Cryptography to National Security

Neil Perry’s talk explores the application of cryptography to several critical areas of national security.

Discussion with Irene Lusztig, the film director, moderated by Jean du Preez

Richland Film Screening and Discussion with Director Irene Lusztig

The film is centered on Richland, WA, the city with the site that produced weapons-grade plutonium for the Manhattan Project and is currently betting its future on its nuclear origin.

Oppenheimer: The Rest of the Story

Dr. Hecker provides the back story to some key elements of the film and shares his views on the legacy of Oppenheimer and the Manhattan Project.

Participants group photo outside on the steps in the sunshine.

2024 CIF Spring Conference Report

High school students and teachers from Japan and the United States discuss ways to advance nuclear disarmament through youth education.

William Potter, Sarah Bidgood, and Hanna Notte

Death Dust: The Rise, Decline, and Future of Radiological Weapons Programs – CISAC Stanford

Death Dust explores the largely unknown history of the rise and demise of RW—sometimes portrayed as a “poor man’s nuclear weapon”—through a series of comparative case studies across the United States, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, Egypt, and Iraq.

Sarah Bidgood, William Potter, and Hanna Notte

Death Dust: The Rise, Decline and Future of Radiological Weapons Programs

This seminar focuses on the findings of the recently published book “Death Dust: The Rise, Decline and Future of Radiological Weapons Programs.”

New Podcast ‘The Reason We’re All Still Here’ Explores Nuclear History

Outrider.org launched a podcast “The Reason We’re All Still Here,” with Jeffrey Lewis discussing nuclear weapons history and the citizens who chose to build a safer world.

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The Age of Great-Power Distraction

Great-power distraction invites considerable long-term risk.

Bulletin of Atomic Scientists

Congressional staffers created antibiotic-resistant bacteria. And that’s a good thing.

Staffers learn how easy it might be to genetically engineer a pathogen and how synthetic biology can speed up the manufacturing of medicinal compounds.

Lab technicians of scientists working on developing a vaccine against virus disease (Src: Shutterstock)

The Danger of ‘Invisible’ Biolabs Across the US

Proper federal oversight could make invisible labs more visible and prevent unsafe labs from working with dangerous pathogens.